Going Gold for Childhood Cancer

In May, I went grey for Brain Tumor Awareness Month, and this month I’m going gold for Childhood cancer awareness month.

If you have been following my blog, in March 2014 just 15 days after being diagnosed with brain cancer, my 2.5 year old nephew passed away. Unfortunately for our family, Kai had one of the most aggressive forms of cancer, AT/RT, which has a 10% survival rate.

What are the facts about childhood cancer:

  • Childhood cancer is the leading cause of deaths by disease among children.
  • This year, 15,000 children in the United States from the age of 0 to 19 will be diagnosed with cancer and 2,000 will pass away from cancer.
  • 41 children in the United States every day will be diagnosed with cancer.
  • One out of every 300 males and one out of every 330 females will develop cancer before their 20th birthday.
  • 40,000 children receive treatment each year for cancer.
  • 20% of children will die from the disease itself, complications with treatment, or a secondary cancer.
  • 96% of the Federal funding for research is for adult cancers, leaving less than 4% for childhood cancer, even though children make up 20% of the cancer population.

What is tragic about the whole situation is childhood cancer only gets 4% of all cancer funds. 4%. These poor, small, innocent children. Despite the fact that children make up 20% of the cancer population, many of these children are given no chance because the majority of the cancer funds are all being used for adult cancers.

For many people, these facts are really easy to read by and not think much of them – to you they are just facts. That ALL changes when childhood cancer affects someone you know. I had never been around cancer or death until Kai got sick. I understand that these are just facts, but for those who know me and my familys story, I hope it changes your thoughts about childhood cancer. If you want to make a difference in these little ones lives, please considering making a donation to St. Jude’s. Please consider going gold for the month of September and spreading awareness about childhood cancer.

Going Gold for Childhood Cancer Awareness

 

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12 Comments
  • Finley
    Posted at 08:02h, 03 September Reply

    What a stark reality it is when you look at it like that – they really are frightening numbers. we were talking just the other day about how charities and organisations should be more clear and open about the percentage of donations that goes to research, families etc and allowing people to see so they can make informed decisions about where to send money – often times sending directly to a family would be a great option. thats amazing that that high a percentage is to adult cancers. i’d be interested to see what australia does!

  • Mia @ MakeMeUpMia
    Posted at 11:06h, 03 September Reply

    Thank you for sharing and making us more aware. You’re right, until you’re affected by something, it’s just facts that you skim over. Things are much different now for sure!

  • Evangeline
    Posted at 11:31h, 03 September Reply

    Cancer devastates so many families. My extended family has seen too many instances of it. Thanks for making us aware of this campaign.

  • Elena
    Posted at 16:15h, 03 September Reply

    Always so sad to hear these statistics! I don’t know any children with cancer, but I’ve had two family members this year pass away from different types of cancer and it’s just awful and completely devastating! Extra prayers to your family this month!

  • Megan Davis
    Posted at 16:23h, 03 September Reply

    Your passion to raise awareness is amazing! Thanks for all you do to honor Kai 🙂

  • Kelli {A Deeper Joy}
    Posted at 17:00h, 03 September Reply

    Mmmm…my heart breaks again for your family losing Kai. This kind of stuff makes me so frustrated and question God but I know He has a greater purpose. Thank you for bringing awareness to this, Caroline!

  • Charity
    Posted at 20:34h, 03 September Reply

    His sweet memory lives on. I am shocked by how many children deal with juvenile cancer as a whole, brain cancer is just horrible. Thanks for spreading the world and educating us all.

  • Tiffany (A Touch of Grace)
    Posted at 23:27h, 03 September Reply

    My heart breaks for your family at losing Kai at such a young age Caroline. That was a huge reality check to see the statistics you shared. Only 4%! That’s crazy! Thank you for sharing this with us!

  • Tania // Run To Radiance
    Posted at 09:32h, 04 September Reply

    Those statistics are tough to see. But this is such a sweet way to honor Kai and all the other families who have had to endure things like this.

  • Sara
    Posted at 10:47h, 04 September Reply

    I am so happy you posted this. My husband and I have been involved in a local children’s cancer organization for years. It was created in honor of our friend’s son who passed away from nueroblastoma. It is heartbreaking that so little money goes into research for childhood cancers. Our local charity not only raises money for research but also directly supports local families with resources they need during such a horrible time for their family. Being a part of it has been an honor, and three years ago I shaved my head for St. Baldrick’s (and raised nearly $9,000!). I know that everyone is different, but maybe you can see if there is a local charity in your area and volunteer. I know it takes a lot of people to keep our local charity going strong.

  • jennifer prod
    Posted at 09:26h, 05 September Reply

    great post, caroline. i honestly didn’t know any of this — but it makes me want to get involved and help.

  • Lisa
    Posted at 22:55h, 06 September Reply

    I’m stunned that childhood cancer only get 4% of the research funds. That’s terrible and needs to change. I’ve always loved St. Jude’s, and now I realize even more how important they are after reading about the funding statistics. Thanks for raising awareness in memory of Kai.

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